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    Facilities Management Benefit from a single source facilities management solution – Frontline Facilities Management service provides support for commercial, industrial and mixed use developments. Read More
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    Energy Management Frontline Energy Management Service includes everything from energy audits, monitoring and targeting through to managing, operating and maintaining plant and equipment assets. Read More
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    District Heating Frontline manage and maintain District Heating and Community Heating Schemes, including system optimisation and end user billing. Read More
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    Electric Ireland Obligated Parties Electric Ireland will part fund energy saving projects through the Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme. Read More

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Helping companies to make effective decisions on issues that positively affect profitability and capital invested.  

Frontline Energy & Environmental is a smart innovative Facilities Management and Energy Management Company.
Energy efficient solutions, while predominantly cost saving are also an integral part of many organisation’s CSR – Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental policies. 
With in-house capabilities Frontline clients benefit from a single source solution, from design of mechanical & electrical requirements through to installation and maintenance of heating and ventilation systems.

Frontline Smart Energy is aimed specifically at SME’s with a focus on the challenges they face with growing energy costs, find out more here. In addition Frontline can help companies avail of funding support from Electric Ireland for energy efficiency projects.
Frontline Energy Management Service includes everything from energy audits, monitoring and targeting through to managing, operating and maintaining plant and equipment assets.  Frontline also manage and maintain District Energy Systems, also known as District Heating Schemes with a comprehensive billing service provided for all end users.

Facilities Management

Frontline Facilities Management Service covers a comprehensive interdisciplinary service devoted to the co- ordination of all business support services.

Energy Management

Frontline Energy Management Service includes everything from energy audits, monitoring and targeting through to managing, operating and maintaining plant and equipment assets.

District Heating Systems

Frontline manage and maintain District Heating and Community Heating Schemes, including system optimisation and end user billing.

Latest News

  • Frontline Energy expands operations into Saudi Arabia

    Frontline Energy expands operations into Saudi ArabiaFrontline is delighted to begin the next phase of our energy and facility management project for Magrabi Hospitals. Frontlines key objective is to provide a comprehensive building management support including energy efficiency measures through a number of implementations to Magrabi hospitals in Saudi Arabia.Frontline Energy provide, effective solutions for businesses looking to reduce energy use, maximise cost savings and minimise the environmental impact for businesses.To learn more about how Frontline can also help you become more sustainable and decrease energy and maintenance costs across your businessdownload our brochureor contact us directly atinfo@frontlineenergy.ieFor more information about Magrabi Hospitals visit their website at MagrabiHospitals.com For more articles and information on energy reduction see below:Energy Management.9 Things You Can Do To Reduce Energy Now

  • Frontline Energy expands operations into Saudi Arabia

    Frontline Energy expands operations into Saudi ArabiaFrontline is delighted to begin the next phase of our energy and facility management project for Magrabi Hospitals. Frontlines key objective is to provide a comprehensive building management support including energy efficiency measures through a number of implementations to Magrabi hospitals in Saudi Arabia.Frontline Energy provide, effective solutions for businesses looking to reduce energy use, maximise cost savings and minimise the environmental impact for businesses.To learn more about how Frontline can also help you become more sustainable and decrease energy and maintenance costs across your businessdownload our brochureor contact us directly atinfo@frontlineenergy.ieFor more information about Magrabi Hospitals visit their website at MagrabiHospitals.com For more articles and information on energy reduction see below:Energy Management.9 Things You Can Do To Reduce Energy Now

  • Top Energy Efficient Cities Worldwide

    We decided to map the league table from the recent report carried out by the American Council for Energy Efficiency examining the most energy efficient cities worldwide.Our infographic explores some of the key elements and activities of the top performing cities worldwide.Reykjavik in Iceland, Vancouver in Canada and Copenhagen in Denmark were at the top of the league table. One thing they all have in common is ambitious targets - with Reykjavik aiming to be fossil free by 2050, Vancouver vying to become the world's greenest city by 2020 and Copenhagen pushing to be the worlds first carbon neutral capital by 2025.We recently took a look at how local governments can equip themselves with the tools to drive energy efficiency. Tools such as these are applicable to both local governments and businesses alike and are part of the growing adoption of energy efficiency policies. Read more here.Other articles that may be of interest:Smart Energy Systems - Holistic Approach to Energy in CitiesSocio Economics and the Future of Energy

  • Clustering of Heat for Energy Efficiency

    Innovative energy solutions for the purposes of energy and CO2 savings can be realised through clustering of commercial sites where heat is a by-product of processes. Our key focus below examines how waste heat can be piped and used by other businesses or indeed multi tenanted residential installations in close proximity.According to analysis done by Parsons Brinckoff and DNV GL in a report done recently, clustering can result in significant decarbonisation in the long term. How do they envisage this working?Clustering can reduce emissions by optimising the use of resources, for example, waste heat from one process can be used to benefit another process. For example, waste heat recovery can bring further energy efficiency benefits through re-use of low grade heat by other heat users outside of the sector producing that waste heat, in turnincreasing other benefits. Many of the decarbonisation options identified by Parsons Brinckoff - such as improved site and sector integration, carbon capture and biomass - could be enabled by further clustering. In certain cases, it can also allow the development of labour market expertise and skills in a cluster area, alongside research and innovation facilities.Clustering is a long-term, gradual option. The barriers to clustering are generally related to organisational collaboration and include the perceived risk of becoming reliant on a partner who may not be present in the long term.In order to support development of clustering, a high-level feasibility study on the potential across different sectors would explore opportunities including a forecast of possible markets or customers for waste heat and other by products. Studies such as these would help mitigate the risks associated with clustering, to support planning and incentive policies by government - both central and local - to encourage clustering. Infrastructure investments (in roads, ports, pipelines, etc.) would strengthen existing clusters and enable the development of new clusters.An example of where and how this can work.An example of a high level feasibility study examining the opportunity for clustering in Dublin was carried out in 2012. Dublin City Council commissioned a project to assess the market for heat demand to businesses and building owners in the Docklands Area in Dublin.GIS mapping was used to estimate the levels of energy demand in the Docklands. In addition to establishing heat energy demand levels, the area was narrowed down to a targeted location within the Docklands area. Each building was required to be suitably located to import heat from planned pipework infrastructure along the River Liffey, focusing the study to a targeted area of Dublin City Centre.The community in the Docklands was informed about the benefits of district heating, how it would function and specific attributes of systems which would export heat. The concept of using a more sustainable source of heat and reducing the demand for oil or gas was well received by both the community and businesss residing in the docklands area. It is expect that some of this heat supply may in the future be drawn from the Dublin City Waste to Energy plant which is currently under construction. Controversial as the site in Ringsend is, the potential for exporting waste heat from Ringsend to the neighbouring communities is an excellent example of clustering on a citywide scale supported by a local government. A recent project carried out by Frontline Energy in Dublin is another good example of clustering on a slightly smaller scale. The cluster in this instance comprised of a commercial office building with CHP equipment positioned to export heat to neighbouring buildings. The neighbouring apartment complex was built with a district heating system installed, specifically with thermal pipework infrastructure. These types of systems allow for importing of heat from external providers from a variety of potential heat sources. Designed and installed as a flexible future proof solution.The complexities of delivering projects of this scale can range from:Ensuring economical operationsStakeholder collaborationProject implementation and worksLegacy issues from existing plant and equipment.Establish the opportunity Verify the demand Communicate to stakeholders Establish the potential.Typical obstacles to overcome when examining the opportunity of exporting heat:Monitoring and verification of heat exported. It is important for heat suppliers to clarify how heat is exported, how it is measured, and verify confirmation of the accuracy of the equipment being used to measure this heat.Cost agreements as to the unit price of the heat unit, how long the fixed rate should be applicable for and how this rate is calculated.Reliability of supply for end users ensuring a reliable and consistent supply of heat is maintained throughout the term of the contract.As these types of agreements are made between commercial entities, smaller end users of waste heat for example can often feel unsupported as it is generally unregulated, however with the emergence of the Independent Heat Customer Protection Scheme in the UK and the UK governments drive to regulate this area, these types of clustering initiatives will start to become more common place with better support over time.Other articles that may be of interest:A look at the Independent Heat Customer Protection Scheme.District Heating Explained.TedX video by Julian Alwood looking at the worldwide use of energy.For more information get in touch with our team.

  • Frontline Energy expands operations into Saudi Arabia

    Frontline Energy expands operations into Saudi ArabiaFrontline is delighted to begin the next phase of our energy and facility management project for Magrabi Hospitals. Frontlines key objective is to provide a comprehensive building management support including energy efficiency measures through a number of implementations to Magrabi hospitals in Saudi Arabia.Frontline Energy provide, effective solutions for businesses looking to reduce energy use, maximise cost savings and minimise the environmental impact for businesses.To learn more about how Frontline can also help you become more sustainable and decrease energy and maintenance costs across your businessdownload our brochureor contact us directly atinfo@frontlineenergy.ieFor more information about Magrabi Hospitals visit their website at MagrabiHospitals.com For more articles and information on energy reduction see below:Energy Management.9 Things You Can Do To Reduce Energy Now

  • Top Energy Efficient Cities Worldwide

    We decided to map the league table from the recent report carried out by the American Council for Energy Efficiency examining the most energy efficient cities worldwide.Our infographic explores some of the key elements and activities of the top performing cities worldwide.Reykjavik in Iceland, Vancouver in Canada and Copenhagen in Denmark were at the top of the league table. One thing they all have in common is ambitious targets - with Reykjavik aiming to be fossil free by 2050, Vancouver vying to become the world's greenest city by 2020 and Copenhagen pushing to be the worlds first carbon neutral capital by 2025.We recently took a look at how local governments can equip themselves with the tools to drive energy efficiency. Tools such as these are applicable to both local governments and businesses alike and are part of the growing adoption of energy efficiency policies. Read more here.Other articles that may be of interest:Smart Energy Systems - Holistic Approach to Energy in CitiesSocio Economics and the Future of Energy

  • Clustering of Heat for Energy Efficiency

    Innovative energy solutions for the purposes of energy and CO2 savings can be realised through clustering of commercial sites where heat is a by-product of processes. Our key focus below examines how waste heat can be piped and used by other businesses or indeed multi tenanted residential installations in close proximity.According to analysis done by Parsons Brinckoff and DNV GL in a report done recently, clustering can result in significant decarbonisation in the long term. How do they envisage this working?Clustering can reduce emissions by optimising the use of resources, for example, waste heat from one process can be used to benefit another process. For example, waste heat recovery can bring further energy efficiency benefits through re-use of low grade heat by other heat users outside of the sector producing that waste heat, in turnincreasing other benefits. Many of the decarbonisation options identified by Parsons Brinckoff - such as improved site and sector integration, carbon capture and biomass - could be enabled by further clustering. In certain cases, it can also allow the development of labour market expertise and skills in a cluster area, alongside research and innovation facilities.Clustering is a long-term, gradual option. The barriers to clustering are generally related to organisational collaboration and include the perceived risk of becoming reliant on a partner who may not be present in the long term.In order to support development of clustering, a high-level feasibility study on the potential across different sectors would explore opportunities including a forecast of possible markets or customers for waste heat and other by products. Studies such as these would help mitigate the risks associated with clustering, to support planning and incentive policies by government - both central and local - to encourage clustering. Infrastructure investments (in roads, ports, pipelines, etc.) would strengthen existing clusters and enable the development of new clusters.An example of where and how this can work.An example of a high level feasibility study examining the opportunity for clustering in Dublin was carried out in 2012. Dublin City Council commissioned a project to assess the market for heat demand to businesses and building owners in the Docklands Area in Dublin.GIS mapping was used to estimate the levels of energy demand in the Docklands. In addition to establishing heat energy demand levels, the area was narrowed down to a targeted location within the Docklands area. Each building was required to be suitably located to import heat from planned pipework infrastructure along the River Liffey, focusing the study to a targeted area of Dublin City Centre.The community in the Docklands was informed about the benefits of district heating, how it would function and specific attributes of systems which would export heat. The concept of using a more sustainable source of heat and reducing the demand for oil or gas was well received by both the community and businesss residing in the docklands area. It is expect that some of this heat supply may in the future be drawn from the Dublin City Waste to Energy plant which is currently under construction. Controversial as the site in Ringsend is, the potential for exporting waste heat from Ringsend to the neighbouring communities is an excellent example of clustering on a citywide scale supported by a local government. A recent project carried out by Frontline Energy in Dublin is another good example of clustering on a slightly smaller scale. The cluster in this instance comprised of a commercial office building with CHP equipment positioned to export heat to neighbouring buildings. The neighbouring apartment complex was built with a district heating system installed, specifically with thermal pipework infrastructure. These types of systems allow for importing of heat from external providers from a variety of potential heat sources. Designed and installed as a flexible future proof solution.The complexities of delivering projects of this scale can range from:Ensuring economical operationsStakeholder collaborationProject implementation and worksLegacy issues from existing plant and equipment.Establish the opportunity Verify the demand Communicate to stakeholders Establish the potential.Typical obstacles to overcome when examining the opportunity of exporting heat:Monitoring and verification of heat exported. It is important for heat suppliers to clarify how heat is exported, how it is measured, and verify confirmation of the accuracy of the equipment being used to measure this heat.Cost agreements as to the unit price of the heat unit, how long the fixed rate should be applicable for and how this rate is calculated.Reliability of supply for end users ensuring a reliable and consistent supply of heat is maintained throughout the term of the contract.As these types of agreements are made between commercial entities, smaller end users of waste heat for example can often feel unsupported as it is generally unregulated, however with the emergence of the Independent Heat Customer Protection Scheme in the UK and the UK governments drive to regulate this area, these types of clustering initiatives will start to become more common place with better support over time.Other articles that may be of interest:A look at the Independent Heat Customer Protection Scheme.District Heating Explained.TedX video by Julian Alwood looking at the worldwide use of energy.For more information get in touch with our team.

  • Top Energy Efficient Cities Worldwide

    We decided to map the league table from the recent report carried out by the American Council for Energy Efficiency examining the most energy efficient cities worldwide.Our infographic explores some of the key elements and activities of the top performing cities worldwide.Reykjavik in Iceland, Vancouver in Canada and Copenhagen in Denmark were at the top of the league table. One thing they all have in common is ambitious targets - with Reykjavik aiming to be fossil free by 2050, Vancouver vying to become the world's greenest city by 2020 and Copenhagen pushing to be the worlds first carbon neutral capital by 2025.We recently took a look at how local governments can equip themselves with the tools to drive energy efficiency. Tools such as these are applicable to both local governments and businesses alike and are part of the growing adoption of energy efficiency policies. Read more here.Other articles that may be of interest:Smart Energy Systems - Holistic Approach to Energy in CitiesSocio Economics and the Future of Energy

  • Clustering of Heat for Energy Efficiency

    Innovative energy solutions for the purposes of energy and CO2 savings can be realised through clustering of commercial sites where heat is a by-product of processes. Our key focus below examines how waste heat can be piped and used by other businesses or indeed multi tenanted residential installations in close proximity.According to analysis done by Parsons Brinckoff and DNV GL in a report done recently, clustering can result in significant decarbonisation in the long term. How do they envisage this working?Clustering can reduce emissions by optimising the use of resources, for example, waste heat from one process can be used to benefit another process. For example, waste heat recovery can bring further energy efficiency benefits through re-use of low grade heat by other heat users outside of the sector producing that waste heat, in turnincreasing other benefits. Many of the decarbonisation options identified by Parsons Brinckoff - such as improved site and sector integration, carbon capture and biomass - could be enabled by further clustering. In certain cases, it can also allow the development of labour market expertise and skills in a cluster area, alongside research and innovation facilities.Clustering is a long-term, gradual option. The barriers to clustering are generally related to organisational collaboration and include the perceived risk of becoming reliant on a partner who may not be present in the long term.In order to support development of clustering, a high-level feasibility study on the potential across different sectors would explore opportunities including a forecast of possible markets or customers for waste heat and other by products. Studies such as these would help mitigate the risks associated with clustering, to support planning and incentive policies by government - both central and local - to encourage clustering. Infrastructure investments (in roads, ports, pipelines, etc.) would strengthen existing clusters and enable the development of new clusters.An example of where and how this can work.An example of a high level feasibility study examining the opportunity for clustering in Dublin was carried out in 2012. Dublin City Council commissioned a project to assess the market for heat demand to businesses and building owners in the Docklands Area in Dublin.GIS mapping was used to estimate the levels of energy demand in the Docklands. In addition to establishing heat energy demand levels, the area was narrowed down to a targeted location within the Docklands area. Each building was required to be suitably located to import heat from planned pipework infrastructure along the River Liffey, focusing the study to a targeted area of Dublin City Centre.The community in the Docklands was informed about the benefits of district heating, how it would function and specific attributes of systems which would export heat. The concept of using a more sustainable source of heat and reducing the demand for oil or gas was well received by both the community and businesss residing in the docklands area. It is expect that some of this heat supply may in the future be drawn from the Dublin City Waste to Energy plant which is currently under construction. Controversial as the site in Ringsend is, the potential for exporting waste heat from Ringsend to the neighbouring communities is an excellent example of clustering on a citywide scale supported by a local government. A recent project carried out by Frontline Energy in Dublin is another good example of clustering on a slightly smaller scale. The cluster in this instance comprised of a commercial office building with CHP equipment positioned to export heat to neighbouring buildings. The neighbouring apartment complex was built with a district heating system installed, specifically with thermal pipework infrastructure. These types of systems allow for importing of heat from external providers from a variety of potential heat sources. Designed and installed as a flexible future proof solution.The complexities of delivering projects of this scale can range from:Ensuring economical operationsStakeholder collaborationProject implementation and worksLegacy issues from existing plant and equipment.Establish the opportunity Verify the demand Communicate to stakeholders Establish the potential.Typical obstacles to overcome when examining the opportunity of exporting heat:Monitoring and verification of heat exported. It is important for heat suppliers to clarify how heat is exported, how it is measured, and verify confirmation of the accuracy of the equipment being used to measure this heat.Cost agreements as to the unit price of the heat unit, how long the fixed rate should be applicable for and how this rate is calculated.Reliability of supply for end users ensuring a reliable and consistent supply of heat is maintained throughout the term of the contract.As these types of agreements are made between commercial entities, smaller end users of waste heat for example can often feel unsupported as it is generally unregulated, however with the emergence of the Independent Heat Customer Protection Scheme in the UK and the UK governments drive to regulate this area, these types of clustering initiatives will start to become more common place with better support over time.Other articles that may be of interest:A look at the Independent Heat Customer Protection Scheme.District Heating Explained.TedX video by Julian Alwood looking at the worldwide use of energy.For more information get in touch with our team.

  • 9 Things You Can Do To Reduce Energy Now

    Infographic exploring a few simple tips and tricks for helping your business to become more energy efficient.Reduce, Reuse, Rethink: 9 Things You Can Do Right Now to Make Your Office More Green from Young Rubicam For more in depth energy efficiency articles have a look below:Energy ManagementEnergy Project - Financing and Funding SupportEnergy Compliance - Advice and Legislation

  • Heat Protection Scheme

    The Independent Heat Customer Protection Scheme is a new initiative in the UK, designed to protect the interests of householders and businesses connected to district heat networks in the UK, Frontline Energy are supportive of the implementation of this scheme in the UK and hope to see a similar scheme being formed in Ireland in the near future.About the SchemeThe purpose of the Independent Heat Protection Scheme is to create a common standard in the level and quality of protection given by heat supply contracts and to offer district heat customers an independent process for settling disputes.Frontline recognises the value of this scheme in protecting as many heat network customers as possible while supporting innovation and best practice within the district heating industry.OutlineThe Independent Heat Customer Protection scheme proposals contain two key components:Assessment criteria by which to evaluate the level of protection a Heat Suppliers Heat Supply Agreement provides to the heat networks customers. This assessment criteria is as follows:Minimum standardsScopeHeat Customer obligations (including access to heat infrastructure)Support for Vulnerable Customers and customers that must not be disconnected in winterHeat Supplier obligations Performance StandardsCustomer service, reporting a fault or emergency, access and repair costsJoining and leaving proceduresMeasuring Heat Customers consumption Heat metersHeat Interface Unit (HIU) maintenanceHeat Bill, heat charge calculations and heat charge comparatorPaying the heat bill and payment difficultiesDisconnection and re-connection processContingency and maintenance planHeat Supplier complaint handlingAdjudication from the Independent Heat Customer Protection SchemePrivacy policy and data protection of Heat Customers personal dataIndependent adjudication, a low cost form of customer dispute resolution once a heat suppliers complaint procedure is exhausted.Where appropriate, the level of protection afforded by the Independent Heat Customer Protection Scheme seeks to replicate that provided to customers in the regulated gas and electricity markets.Further reading:Visit our District Heating section for more information, or here for some of our frequently asked questions.How District Heating benefits users is explored in our infographic here.Can't find what you are looking for? Get in touch.

  • Heat Protection Scheme

    The Independent Heat Customer Protection Scheme is a new initiative in the UK, designed to protect the interests of householders and businesses connected to district heat networks in the UK, Frontline Energy are supportive of the implementation of this scheme in the UK and hope to see a similar scheme being formed in Ireland in the near future.About the SchemeThe purpose of the Independent Heat Protection Scheme is to create a common standard in the level and quality of protection given by heat supply contracts and to offer district heat customers an independent process for settling disputes.Frontline recognises the value of this scheme in protecting as many heat network customers as possible while supporting innovation and best practice within the district heating industry.OutlineThe Independent Heat Customer Protection scheme proposals contain two key components:Assessment criteria by which to evaluate the level of protection a Heat Suppliers Heat Supply Agreement provides to the heat networks customers. This assessment criteria is as follows:Minimum standardsScopeHeat Customer obligations (including access to heat infrastructure)Support for Vulnerable Customers and customers that must not be disconnected in winterHeat Supplier obligations Performance StandardsCustomer service, reporting a fault or emergency, access and repair costsJoining and leaving proceduresMeasuring Heat Customers consumption Heat metersHeat Interface Unit (HIU) maintenanceHeat Bill, heat charge calculations and heat charge comparatorPaying the heat bill and payment difficultiesDisconnection and re-connection processContingency and maintenance planHeat Supplier complaint handlingAdjudication from the Independent Heat Customer Protection SchemePrivacy policy and data protection of Heat Customers personal dataIndependent adjudication, a low cost form of customer dispute resolution once a heat suppliers complaint procedure is exhausted.Where appropriate, the level of protection afforded by the Independent Heat Customer Protection Scheme seeks to replicate that provided to customers in the regulated gas and electricity markets.Further reading:Visit our District Heating section for more information, or here for some of our frequently asked questions.How District Heating benefits users is explored in our infographic here.Can't find what you are looking for? Get in touch.

  • Heat Protection Scheme

    The Independent Heat Customer Protection Scheme is a new initiative in the UK, designed to protect the interests of householders and businesses connected to district heat networks in the UK, Frontline Energy are supportive of the implementation of this scheme in the UK and hope to see a similar scheme being formed in Ireland in the near future.About the SchemeThe purpose of the Independent Heat Protection Scheme is to create a common standard in the level and quality of protection given by heat supply contracts and to offer district heat customers an independent process for settling disputes.Frontline recognises the value of this scheme in protecting as many heat network customers as possible while supporting innovation and best practice within the district heating industry.OutlineThe Independent Heat Customer Protection scheme proposals contain two key components:Assessment criteria by which to evaluate the level of protection a Heat Suppliers Heat Supply Agreement provides to the heat networks customers. This assessment criteria is as follows:Minimum standardsScopeHeat Customer obligations (including access to heat infrastructure)Support for Vulnerable Customers and customers that must not be disconnected in winterHeat Supplier obligations Performance StandardsCustomer service, reporting a fault or emergency, access and repair costsJoining and leaving proceduresMeasuring Heat Customers consumption Heat metersHeat Interface Unit (HIU) maintenanceHeat Bill, heat charge calculations and heat charge comparatorPaying the heat bill and payment difficultiesDisconnection and re-connection processContingency and maintenance planHeat Supplier complaint handlingAdjudication from the Independent Heat Customer Protection SchemePrivacy policy and data protection of Heat Customers personal dataIndependent adjudication, a low cost form of customer dispute resolution once a heat suppliers complaint procedure is exhausted.Where appropriate, the level of protection afforded by the Independent Heat Customer Protection Scheme seeks to replicate that provided to customers in the regulated gas and electricity markets.Further reading:Visit our District Heating section for more information, or here for some of our frequently asked questions.How District Heating benefits users is explored in our infographic here.Can't find what you are looking for? Get in touch.

  • Use Less Energy

    Another great video from Cambridge Universitys Dr. Julian Allwood exploring worldwide energy use, courtesy of Tedx. Dr Allwood delves into various energy topics from the viability of Renewable Technologies including Carbon Storage and Electric Vehicles.He takes a pragmatic approach to the various technologies and government policies. Dr. Allwoods has an interesting opinion on how humans sometimes interact with energy efficient technologies, that when we step forward with efficiency we expand our use, he uses an interesting case study to highlight this. This riveting Tedx talk finishes with a philosophical conclusion, questioning fundamental issues of modern society, 15mins well spent.amp;amp;lt;br _moz_dirty="" /amp;amp;gt;

  • Use Less Energy

    Another great video from Cambridge Universitys Dr. Julian Allwood exploring worldwide energy use, courtesy of Tedx. Dr Allwood delves into various energy topics from the viability of Renewable Technologies including Carbon Storage and Electric Vehicles.He takes a pragmatic approach to the various technologies and government policies. Dr. Allwoods has an interesting opinion on how humans sometimes interact with energy efficient technologies, that when we step forward with efficiency we expand our use, he uses an interesting case study to highlight this. This riveting Tedx talk finishes with a philosophical conclusion, questioning fundamental issues of modern society, 15mins well spent.amp;amp;lt;br _moz_dirty="" /amp;amp;gt;

  • Electric Ireland and Frontline Energy Supporting Irish SMEs

    ELECTRIC IRELAND WORKING WITH FRONTLINE ENERGY TO SUPPORT IRISH SMESFrontline Energy in partnership with Electric Ireland are providing Irish SMEs with Energy Efficiency advice and project support in the drive to reduce energy consumption in Ireland. Electric Ireland is now part funding energy saving projects through the Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme. The Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme (EEOS) is being implemented pursuant to the Energy Efficiency Directive 2012, Article 7. The purpose is to drive support for Energy Efficiency works - Frontline Energy provides support by identifying energy saving opportunities for your building and business.Click to download our Flierand get in touch with Sam now to find out more by emailing energy@frontlineenergy.ieHow we streamline your business into taking control of your energy costs:Step 1:The first step for helping you reduce your energy costs is for Frontline to get a full understanding of your energy usage, challenges, sources and costs.Step 2:A baseline of your energy is established to ensure monitoring of energy savings is possible. The Frontline Energy will outline a variety of improvement plansfor your building or business, including immediate wins all the way through to larger projects and everything in between.Step 3:Based on the plan of action, Frontlines Smart Energy team will Design, Project Manage and Commission the preferred energy efficiency plan of action. Step 4:Frontlines Smart Energy Team will provide ongoing energy monitoring and support to ensure your consumption and costs are effectively controlled, ensuring your business remains competitive.David Connolly, CEO Frontline Energy commented:Energy efficiency projects are testament to Irish business actively engaging on energy measures that are both good for the bottom line, and good for the environment. Frontline continues to work hard for Irish business in these really important areas. Our most recent engagement will save the client 2.4m over 8 years, with a capex of 210k.More articles that may be of interest to you:Smart Energy siteGrant Financing SupportFor more information on Funding, get in contact with Sam in Frontline Energy.

  • Electric Ireland and Frontline Energy Supporting Irish SMEs

    ELECTRIC IRELAND WORKING WITH FRONTLINE ENERGY TO SUPPORT IRISH SMESFrontline Energy in partnership with Electric Ireland are providing Irish SMEs with Energy Efficiency advice and project support in the drive to reduce energy consumption in Ireland. Electric Ireland is now part funding energy saving projects through the Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme. The Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme (EEOS) is being implemented pursuant to the Energy Efficiency Directive 2012, Article 7. The purpose is to drive support for Energy Efficiency works - Frontline Energy provides support by identifying energy saving opportunities for your building and business.Click to download our Flierand get in touch with Sam now to find out more by emailing energy@frontlineenergy.ieHow we streamline your business into taking control of your energy costs:Step 1:The first step for helping you reduce your energy costs is for Frontline to get a full understanding of your energy usage, challenges, sources and costs.Step 2:A baseline of your energy is established to ensure monitoring of energy savings is possible. The Frontline Energy will outline a variety of improvement plansfor your building or business, including immediate wins all the way through to larger projects and everything in between.Step 3:Based on the plan of action, Frontlines Smart Energy team will Design, Project Manage and Commission the preferred energy efficiency plan of action. Step 4:Frontlines Smart Energy Team will provide ongoing energy monitoring and support to ensure your consumption and costs are effectively controlled, ensuring your business remains competitive.David Connolly, CEO Frontline Energy commented:Energy efficiency projects are testament to Irish business actively engaging on energy measures that are both good for the bottom line, and good for the environment. Frontline continues to work hard for Irish business in these really important areas. Our most recent engagement will save the client 2.4m over 8 years, with a capex of 210k.More articles that may be of interest to you:Smart Energy siteGrant Financing SupportFor more information on Funding, get in contact with Sam in Frontline Energy.

  • Electric Ireland and Frontline Energy Supporting Irish SMEs

    ELECTRIC IRELAND WORKING WITH FRONTLINE ENERGY TO SUPPORT IRISH SMESFrontline Energy in partnership with Electric Ireland are providing Irish SMEs with Energy Efficiency advice and project support in the drive to reduce energy consumption in Ireland. Electric Ireland is now part funding energy saving projects through the Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme. The Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme (EEOS) is being implemented pursuant to the Energy Efficiency Directive 2012, Article 7. The purpose is to drive support for Energy Efficiency works - Frontline Energy provides support by identifying energy saving opportunities for your building and business.Click to download our Flierand get in touch with Sam now to find out more by emailing energy@frontlineenergy.ieHow we streamline your business into taking control of your energy costs:Step 1:The first step for helping you reduce your energy costs is for Frontline to get a full understanding of your energy usage, challenges, sources and costs.Step 2:A baseline of your energy is established to ensure monitoring of energy savings is possible. The Frontline Energy will outline a variety of improvement plansfor your building or business, including immediate wins all the way through to larger projects and everything in between.Step 3:Based on the plan of action, Frontlines Smart Energy team will Design, Project Manage and Commission the preferred energy efficiency plan of action. Step 4:Frontlines Smart Energy Team will provide ongoing energy monitoring and support to ensure your consumption and costs are effectively controlled, ensuring your business remains competitive.David Connolly, CEO Frontline Energy commented:Energy efficiency projects are testament to Irish business actively engaging on energy measures that are both good for the bottom line, and good for the environment. Frontline continues to work hard for Irish business in these really important areas. Our most recent engagement will save the client 2.4m over 8 years, with a capex of 210k.More articles that may be of interest to you:Smart Energy siteGrant Financing SupportFor more information on Funding, get in contact with Sam in Frontline Energy.

  • Cross Sector Summary of UK Carbon Plan

    Cross Sector Summary of UK Carbon PlanIn 2011 the United Kingdom government set out a Carbon Plan which suggested that the UK economy could de-carbonise and reduce overall emissions up to 70% by 2050 respective to 2012 emissions.Eight energy-intensive sectors make up two thirds of industrial emissions from cement, ceramics, chemicals, food and drink, glass, iron and steel, oil refining and pulp and paper. Despite the fact that these sectors combined only employ around 2% of the UKs workforce they contribute a staggering annual 50 billion to the economy, approximately 4% of the UKs Gross Value Added (GVA). However with great monetary returns comes great responsibility as these sectors use the most amount of energy and in turn produce the highest carbon dioxide emissions.A cross sector summary report by Parsons Brinckerhoff and DNV GL has outlined that subsequently the continued deployment of energy efficiency technologies combined with electricity grid de-carbonisation could deliver 32% emissions reduction by 2050. This could be increased to a 73% emissions reduction by deploying an assessment process of combined maximum technology pathway in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of cost. These assessments are set against assumptions of how industrial emissions will change as a result of changing production levels due to economic cycles.The core focus is to drive efficiencies through progressive grid de-carbonisation by continued investment in energy efficiency measures and a focus on business as usual. The potential to reduce 81 million tonnes of CO2 in 2012 down to 58 million tonnes of CO2 by 2050 has been identified by Parsons Brinckerhoff and DNV GL which gives an ambitious but far more realistic target of 62% reduction of total emissions relative to the 2012 baseline.

  • Maintain Your Building

    Maintain Your BuildingWhy should businesses and building owners implement Planned Preventative Maintenance Programs:Better Cost Planning reduce surprises.Cost savings Planned Maintenance programs can save building owners between 15-18% annually.Improved equipment lifespan.Improved equipment efficiencies.Better maintained equipment operates more efficiently and quite simply lasts longer.amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;br _moz_dirty="" /amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Check out our infographic which explores preventative maintenance in more detail.Other articles that might be of interest to you:The role of the Facility Manager.Electric Ireland Providing Funding Support to Irish SME's.Find out more, get in touch.

  • Maintain Your Building

    Maintain Your BuildingWhy should businesses and building owners implement Planned Preventative Maintenance Programs:Better Cost Planning reduce surprises.Cost savings Planned Maintenance programs can save building owners between 15-18% annually.Improved equipment lifespan.Improved equipment efficiencies.Better maintained equipment operates more efficiently and quite simply lasts longer.amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;br _moz_dirty="" /amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Check out our infographic which explores preventative maintenance in more detail.Other articles that might be of interest to you:The role of the Facility Manager.Electric Ireland Providing Funding Support to Irish SME's.Find out more, get in touch.

  • R22 Gas Phase Out

    What is R22 Gas?R22 Gas previously the refrigerant of choice for heat pump and air-conditioning systems for over four decades.A recent report carried out byWhy is it being phased out?In 2010 a directive was issued to all EU member states against the use of R22 in new refrigerant based systems due to its Ozone Depleting Substance (according to the EPA).As of January 1st 2015 an EU ban is in force banning all refrigerant repairs on equipment containing R22.What are the chances that my building is effected?If the air-conditioning in your building was installed before 2010 there is a likelihood that it uses R22 refrigerant, this will have serious implications for your air-conditioning system.How can I find out if we use R22 Refrigerant?Call Sean or Seamus on (01) 643 2100 to arrange for a no obligation, no fee site visit to building owners in Dublin and surrounding areas.

  • R22 Gas Phase Out

    What is R22 Gas?R22 Gas previously the refrigerant of choice for heat pump and air-conditioning systems for over four decades.A recent report carried out byWhy is it being phased out?In 2010 a directive was issued to all EU member states against the use of R22 in new refrigerant based systems due to its Ozone Depleting Substance (according to the EPA).As of January 1st 2015 an EU ban is in force banning all refrigerant repairs on equipment containing R22.What are the chances that my building is effected?If the air-conditioning in your building was installed before 2010 there is a likelihood that it uses R22 refrigerant, this will have serious implications for your air-conditioning system.How can I find out if we use R22 Refrigerant?Call Sean or Seamus on (01) 643 2100 to arrange for a no obligation, no fee site visit to building owners in Dublin and surrounding areas.

  • R22 Gas Phase Out

    What is R22 Gas?R22 Gas previously the refrigerant of choice for heat pump and air-conditioning systems for over four decades.A recent report carried out byWhy is it being phased out?In 2010 a directive was issued to all EU member states against the use of R22 in new refrigerant based systems due to its Ozone Depleting Substance (according to the EPA).As of January 1st 2015 an EU ban is in force banning all refrigerant repairs on equipment containing R22.What are the chances that my building is effected?If the air-conditioning in your building was installed before 2010 there is a likelihood that it uses R22 refrigerant, this will have serious implications for your air-conditioning system.How can I find out if we use R22 Refrigerant?Call Sean or Seamus on (01) 643 2100 to arrange for a no obligation, no fee site visit to building owners in Dublin and surrounding areas.

  • Energy Efficiency Policies

    A recent article by the American Council for Energy Efficiency (ACEEE) provided a toolkit around how local government can plan and implement Energy Efficiency Polices. These recommendations are applicable to both local governments and businesses alike and are part of the growing adoption of Energy Efficiency policies.ACEEE article is aimed at helping local governments in the US to implement energy efficiency policies. In Ireland the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland SEAI are champions of sustainable policies. A number of current and past SEAI programs reflect the guidelines as set out in the ACEEE report. The Better Energy Workplace, which grant supported businesses ran from 2011 to 2012 is an example of one support scheme targeted at businesses and commercial buildings. Frontline Energy Environmental carried out a number of energy efficiency projects, including one atMerrion Hallin Dublin, Ireland.One of the current programs under SEAI includes the framework support required for delivery of energy efficiency services to the Public Sector in Ireland. These programs include Advisory Services and Delivery of Expert Energy Advisory Services to the public sector, with a number of Energy Management companies being nominated to deliver these services. Very much in keeping with recommendations from the ACEEE report, the SEAI are already driving energy efficiency policies forward throughout Ireland.A number of key baseline factors outlined in the tool kit include the following:Understanding when and how facilities use energy is the first step in managing and reducing usage.Energy Policy time frames in most cases will be a baseline method, and what we mean by this is either:The date for a single year (a single year in the past).A rolling average (the average of several immediately previous years).Annual time-frame (the immediate previous year).Time framing enables success in the near, medium and long-term future for energy goals. At the beginning it is wise to have near-term success builds to support for long-term energy management strategies. For example, requiring a 5% reduction after 5 years, 20% after 10 years, and 50% after 20 years mobilises a business into taking action and increases momentum. In tracking progress, it is important for businesses to track data relevant to normalizing energy use by economic or service activity by one of the following:kilowatt-hours (kWh).gas emissions (GHGs).carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) equivalents.Research from 2013 in the US estimates that on average 21-28% of baselines energy use was saved in buildings with Energy Performance Contracting (EPC) in operation. This in turn transitions a business into having an energy conscious ethos within its operations.Introducing energy management goals that are in line with a businesss overall vision helps a business achieve energy and cost saving benefits through reductions.Frontline Energy are one of the SEAI nominated service providers forAdvisory Services and Delivery of Expert Energy Advisory Services to the public sector.To find out how your business can become more energy efficient, get in touch with the Frontline Energy Team.Other Energy Efficient Case Studies:Energy Efficient Lighting UpgradeAir Conditioning Upgrade Phase out of R22 Refrigerant Gas.Further reading and viewing:Use less energy - Tedx videoThe world in carbon dioxide - infographicIntergovernmental Report on Climate ChangeSustainable Energy Supply Chain.

  • Energy Efficiency Policies

    A recent article by the American Council for Energy Efficiency (ACEEE) provided a toolkit around how local government can plan and implement Energy Efficiency Polices. These recommendations are applicable to both local governments and businesses alike and are part of the growing adoption of Energy Efficiency policies.ACEEE article is aimed at helping local governments in the US to implement energy efficiency policies. In Ireland the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland SEAI are champions of sustainable policies. A number of current and past SEAI programs reflect the guidelines as set out in the ACEEE report. The Better Energy Workplace, which grant supported businesses ran from 2011 to 2012 is an example of one support scheme targeted at businesses and commercial buildings. Frontline Energy Environmental carried out a number of energy efficiency projects, including one atMerrion Hallin Dublin, Ireland.One of the current programs under SEAI includes the framework support required for delivery of energy efficiency services to the Public Sector in Ireland. These programs include Advisory Services and Delivery of Expert Energy Advisory Services to the public sector, with a number of Energy Management companies being nominated to deliver these services. Very much in keeping with recommendations from the ACEEE report, the SEAI are already driving energy efficiency policies forward throughout Ireland.A number of key baseline factors outlined in the tool kit include the following:Understanding when and how facilities use energy is the first step in managing and reducing usage.Energy Policy time frames in most cases will be a baseline method, and what we mean by this is either:The date for a single year (a single year in the past).A rolling average (the average of several immediately previous years).Annual time-frame (the immediate previous year).Time framing enables success in the near, medium and long-term future for energy goals. At the beginning it is wise to have near-term success builds to support for long-term energy management strategies. For example, requiring a 5% reduction after 5 years, 20% after 10 years, and 50% after 20 years mobilises a business into taking action and increases momentum. In tracking progress, it is important for businesses to track data relevant to normalizing energy use by economic or service activity by one of the following:kilowatt-hours (kWh).gas emissions (GHGs).carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) equivalents.Research from 2013 in the US estimates that on average 21-28% of baselines energy use was saved in buildings with Energy Performance Contracting (EPC) in operation. This in turn transitions a business into having an energy conscious ethos within its operations.Introducing energy management goals that are in line with a businesss overall vision helps a business achieve energy and cost saving benefits through reductions.Frontline Energy are one of the SEAI nominated service providers forAdvisory Services and Delivery of Expert Energy Advisory Services to the public sector.To find out how your business can become more energy efficient, get in touch with the Frontline Energy Team.Other Energy Efficient Case Studies:Energy Efficient Lighting UpgradeAir Conditioning Upgrade Phase out of R22 Refrigerant Gas.Further reading and viewing:Use less energy - Tedx videoThe world in carbon dioxide - infographicIntergovernmental Report on Climate ChangeSustainable Energy Supply Chain.

  • Energy Efficiency Policies

    A recent article by the American Council for Energy Efficiency (ACEEE) provided a toolkit around how local government can plan and implement Energy Efficiency Polices. These recommendations are applicable to both local governments and businesses alike and are part of the growing adoption of Energy Efficiency policies.ACEEE article is aimed at helping local governments in the US to implement energy efficiency policies. In Ireland the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland SEAI are champions of sustainable policies. A number of current and past SEAI programs reflect the guidelines as set out in the ACEEE report. The Better Energy Workplace, which grant supported businesses ran from 2011 to 2012 is an example of one support scheme targeted at businesses and commercial buildings. Frontline Energy Environmental carried out a number of energy efficiency projects, including one atMerrion Hallin Dublin, Ireland.One of the current programs under SEAI includes the framework support required for delivery of energy efficiency services to the Public Sector in Ireland. These programs include Advisory Services and Delivery of Expert Energy Advisory Services to the public sector, with a number of Energy Management companies being nominated to deliver these services. Very much in keeping with recommendations from the ACEEE report, the SEAI are already driving energy efficiency policies forward throughout Ireland.A number of key baseline factors outlined in the tool kit include the following:Understanding when and how facilities use energy is the first step in managing and reducing usage.Energy Policy time frames in most cases will be a baseline method, and what we mean by this is either:The date for a single year (a single year in the past).A rolling average (the average of several immediately previous years).Annual time-frame (the immediate previous year).Time framing enables success in the near, medium and long-term future for energy goals. At the beginning it is wise to have near-term success builds to support for long-term energy management strategies. For example, requiring a 5% reduction after 5 years, 20% after 10 years, and 50% after 20 years mobilises a business into taking action and increases momentum. In tracking progress, it is important for businesses to track data relevant to normalizing energy use by economic or service activity by one of the following:kilowatt-hours (kWh).gas emissions (GHGs).carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) equivalents.Research from 2013 in the US estimates that on average 21-28% of baselines energy use was saved in buildings with Energy Performance Contracting (EPC) in operation. This in turn transitions a business into having an energy conscious ethos within its operations.Introducing energy management goals that are in line with a businesss overall vision helps a business achieve energy and cost saving benefits through reductions.Frontline Energy are one of the SEAI nominated service providers forAdvisory Services and Delivery of Expert Energy Advisory Services to the public sector.To find out how your business can become more energy efficient, get in touch with the Frontline Energy Team.Other Energy Efficient Case Studies:Energy Efficient Lighting UpgradeAir Conditioning Upgrade Phase out of R22 Refrigerant Gas.Further reading and viewing:Use less energy - Tedx videoThe world in carbon dioxide - infographicIntergovernmental Report on Climate ChangeSustainable Energy Supply Chain.

  • The Role of the Facility Manager

    Excellent video outlining and exploring what it is that Facilities Managers do and the importance of their role in supporting businesses.amp;lt;br _moz_dirty="" /amp;gt;Frontline Energy Environmental provide business support to clients through a comprehensive facilities management service. More information is available hereor to get in touch call us on 01 643 2100 or email us at info@frontlineenergy.ie.Video via YouTube by the Pratt Institute.

  • The World in Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Great Infographic looking at the world in Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Courtesy ofrmmojado published throughVisually.

  • Frontline Smart Energy

    .Introducing Frontline Smart Energy is the new structured way to take control of your business energy costs. Focussed on helping Irish businesses and public bodies manage and reduce their energy consumption and costs.If carbon or cost reduction is your aim, the Frontline Smart Energy Team can help you to reduce your carbon emissions and increase your efficiency in energy use.The Frontline Smart Energy Team of surveyors and technicians work on energy efficiency projects daily and have created a four step action plan to help clients reduce their energy costs. This plan covers setting objectives, audits, researching and designing the best solution for each client and for implementing any agreed projects.Smart StartSmart CheckSmart ActionSmart ManageTo find out more, contact the Frontline Smart Energy team on +353 1 6432100 orclick herefor more detailed information about our four step Energy Management Program.

  • Smart Boiler Control Systems

    Servicing your boiler annually ensures that it continues to burn efficiently and in line with the manufacturers performance design. In addition, there are a number of smart technologies available which can improve the burners efficiency and reduce the fuel usage by between 15% to 30%. These smart devices also provide useful web based diagnostics and reports, working comfortably on their own or alongside any installed Building Management System (BMS).Normally when a burner fires it first purges the gases and heat in the boiler before igniting the new fuel being supplied resulting in heat lost and additional electrical consumption. So usually a boiler will fire frequently and in short cycles to keep boiler temperature within a narrow range, wasting energy for no obvious changes to the buildings comfort levels.Thesesmart devices are normally fixed onto the boiler and calculate the optimum firing intervals and duration for desired comfort level based on the building fabric heat loss. In practical terms this produces fewer but longer burn periods and reduces the inefficiencies associated with frequent heat purges.Funding and grant support for this type of technology and installation is available through SEAI and the Utility Suppliers, through the obligated parties scheme.Depending on your boiler size, building fabric and fuel use, savings can be as high as 30% generating great return on any investment required.For more information on ways to reduce energy consumption, get in touch with the Frontline Energy Team by emailing tom.gillett@frontlineenergy.ie or browse some of our Energy Management services here.

  • Smart Boiler Control Systems

    Servicing your boiler annually ensures that it continues to burn efficiently and in line with the manufacturers performance design. In addition, there are a number of smart technologies available which can improve the burners efficiency and reduce the fuel usage by between 15% to 30%. These smart devices also provide useful web based diagnostics and reports, working comfortably on their own or alongside any installed Building Management System (BMS).Normally when a burner fires it first purges the gases and heat in the boiler before igniting the new fuel being supplied resulting in heat lost and additional electrical consumption. So usually a boiler will fire frequently and in short cycles to keep boiler temperature within a narrow range, wasting energy for no obvious changes to the buildings comfort levels.Thesesmart devices are normally fixed onto the boiler and calculate the optimum firing intervals and duration for desired comfort level based on the building fabric heat loss. In practical terms this produces fewer but longer burn periods and reduces the inefficiencies associated with frequent heat purges.Funding and grant support for this type of technology and installation is available through SEAI and the Utility Suppliers, through the obligated parties scheme.Depending on your boiler size, building fabric and fuel use, savings can be as high as 30% generating great return on any investment required.For more information on ways to reduce energy consumption, get in touch with the Frontline Energy Team by emailing tom.gillett@frontlineenergy.ie or browse some of our Energy Management services here.

  • LED Inventors Nobel Prize Winners

    The Nobel Laureats for Physics 2014 areIsamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura, for having invented a new environmentally friendly, energy efficient light source, the LED. The revolutionary team of Amano and Akasaki working together at the University of Nagoya and Nakamura, employed at Nichia Chemicals, a small company in Tokushima, Japan.The Alfred Nobel prize rewards inventions of the greatest benefit to mankind, something the LED light does in a multitude of ways.With almost a fourth of world electricity consumption estimated to be for lighting purposes, changing over to LEDs fundamentally contributes to saving the Earths resources. LEDs last up to 100,000 hours, compared to 1,000 for incandescent bulbs and 10,000 hours for fluroescent lights, also reducing the quantity of materials required.In addition to this, the LED has lower power requirements, something that can improve the quality of life for the 1.4billion people around the world who do not have access to electricity grids as these type of lamps have lower power requirements.Click here to read about aspects and benefits of LEDs for car park installations.Twitter @FrontlineEnerg

  • Smart Energy Systems

    It is expected that Denmark will be able to switch to 100% renewable energy by 2050 according to Henrik Lund of Aalborg University, Denmark at a recent lecture at the 21st International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering (CHISA) in Prague.The approach to achieve this is a holistic one, focussing on Smart Energy Systems. By considering heating, transport as well as electricity generation, the Danish government has set several interim targets. These targets include 50% of energy to be generated by wind by 2020 and by 2030 no coal burning power plants will be in operation. It is also a target that no household will use oil for heating by 2030.Energy consumption in Denmark is probably one of the most stable in the world, with universal cross-party support for the 2050 100% renewable goal set out.Of Denmarks electricity generation, approximately 30% is wind generated with 50% coming from small-scale Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plants for District Energy or District Heating, a much more efficient solution than individual homes having their own boilers. One challenge from all of this efficiently produced energy was that on occasion the supply of wind-generated electricity occasionally can exceed demand. Solutions that can transfer the energy use to another application such as transport will be key to sustainable energy solutions.If you solely look at electricity, then you will say to yourself that there are imbalances between wind and demand and so on, and you identify solutions like electricity storage, batteries, or flexible demand, or you may even build transmission lines to neighbouring countries, but if you broaden this to include heating and transportation and so forth, then you have more options to balance, said Lund.Transport has been a major issue, according to Lund. Electric vehicles are not suitable for every application so liquid fuels will still be necessary to supplement these. Biomass and biofuels will be able to meet some of the demand, but not all. Lund proposes a solution to use excess energy in the grid to produce hydrogen, not for use in fuel cells, but to hydrogenate some of the bio-derived oils directly to produce synthetic fuels.As storing energy is very difficult and not particularly economical, the Smart Energy System as outlined in Lunds lecture is a sustainable approach for future energy challenges.If you are interested in finding out more about District Heating in Ireland or other energy efficient approaches, get in touch with the Frontline Energy Team hereor email info@frontlineenergy.ie

  • Smart Energy Systems

    It is expected that Denmark will be able to switch to 100% renewable energy by 2050 according to Henrik Lund of Aalborg University, Denmark at a recent lecture at the 21st International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering (CHISA) in Prague.The approach to achieve this is a holistic one, focussing on Smart Energy Systems. By considering heating, transport as well as electricity generation, the Danish government has set several interim targets. These targets include 50% of energy to be generated by wind by 2020 and by 2030 no coal burning power plants will be in operation. It is also a target that no household will use oil for heating by 2030.Energy consumption in Denmark is probably one of the most stable in the world, with universal cross-party support for the 2050 100% renewable goal set out.Of Denmarks electricity generation, approximately 30% is wind generated with 50% coming from small-scale Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plants for District Energy or District Heating, a much more efficient solution than individual homes having their own boilers. One challenge from all of this efficiently produced energy was that on occasion the supply of wind-generated electricity occasionally can exceed demand. Solutions that can transfer the energy use to another application such as transport will be key to sustainable energy solutions.If you solely look at electricity, then you will say to yourself that there are imbalances between wind and demand and so on, and you identify solutions like electricity storage, batteries, or flexible demand, or you may even build transmission lines to neighbouring countries, but if you broaden this to include heating and transportation and so forth, then you have more options to balance, said Lund.Transport has been a major issue, according to Lund. Electric vehicles are not suitable for every application so liquid fuels will still be necessary to supplement these. Biomass and biofuels will be able to meet some of the demand, but not all. Lund proposes a solution to use excess energy in the grid to produce hydrogen, not for use in fuel cells, but to hydrogenate some of the bio-derived oils directly to produce synthetic fuels.As storing energy is very difficult and not particularly economical, the Smart Energy System as outlined in Lunds lecture is a sustainable approach for future energy challenges.If you are interested in finding out more about District Heating in Ireland or other energy efficient approaches, get in touch with the Frontline Energy Team hereor email info@frontlineenergy.ie

  • Building Regulations And Benefits of District Heating

    In relation to the Domestic Building Regulations in Ireland Part L, the most recent amendment of which came into effect in 2011. These amendments are applicable to buildingswhere the work, material alteration or the change of use commences or takes place, as the case may be, on or before 30 November 2011, or where planning approval or permissionhas been applied for on or before 30 November 2011 and substantial work has been completed by 30 November 2013.The purpose of this amendment is to improve the energy efficiency of new domestic buildings in Ireland. This aspect of Part L only relates to domestic applications, not non domestic construction work. In addition to limiting the amount of energy a dwelling now needs to produce, a target efficiency of 0.4 MPEPC is outlined in the 2011 Regulations, (MPEPC stands for the Maximum Permitted Energy Performance Coefficient).The achievement of this value eclipses all of the other minimums in the Part L Regulations (air tightness, thermal bridging and U values) and must be determined prior to construction. How this is to be delivered as the dwelling needs to be assessed in it totality is done using the DEAP (Dwelling Energy Assessment Procedure) software. This software can be downloaded from theSEAI website here.Essentially this means that a dwelling built to the new Part L is limited to using 40% of the energy of a house built in 2005.There are a number of methods being deployed to achieve this target, including higher performance building fabrication and more efficient equipment.As outlined in a recent report from the International Energy Agency (download theIEAs report)earlier this year one of the most efficient methods for heating space and hot water is through District Heating installations, in particular through co-generation from Combined Heat and Power installations. To understand in a simple format the differences between CHP and traditional power generation, our simpleInfographic.District Heating Infographic, which distribute thermal energy among end users in a network, can be coupled with efficient generation sources such as CHP or with other locally available energy sources, such as waste heat, renewables or natural cooling from water sources, for further environmental gains. District Heat networks based on these sources can be five to ten times more efficient than traditional electricity-driven equipment. A recent report from the International Energy Agency explored District Heating Networks and co-generation and places particular emphasis on encouraging policy makers to learn from existing successful installations.As we move forward, efficient and flexible technologies will become increasingly important, andpolicy makers and project developers should learn from the experiences of others in order to fullyrealise the potential of co‐generation and DHC. By building upon past successes, we can use lessonslearned to help create a better integrated energy system in the future.Maria van der Hoeven,Executive Director,International Energy Agency (IEA)The full report can be downloaded here. For information on Frontline Energys district heating service, please visit our District Heating Service pageor get in touch with the Frontline Energy Team info@frontlineenergy.ie

  • Intergovernmental Report on Climate Change

    Intergovernmental Report on Climate ChangeThe Intergovernmental Panel Report on Climate Change 2013 was published recently. Through a worldwide panel of experts a number of factors from physical science have been observed, some of which we have explored below, drawing a number of possible conclusions.The panel concluded that continued emissions of greenhouse gases will cause further warming and changes in all aspects of the climate system.Limiting climate change will require substantial and sustained reductions of greenhouse gas emissions.Other articles and infographics that may interest you:Top Energy Efficient Cities Worldwide - Scorecard.ACEEE Energy Efficiency Policies for Governments.Smart Energy Systems - CopenhagenThe Economics of Energy Efficiency

  • Sustainable Energy Supply Chain

    A recent report published by the SEAI Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland has called on businesses to explore opportunities in Irelands sustainable energy sector. The report, entitled Irelands Sustainable Energy Supply Chain Opportunitywas carried out in consultation with Forfas, Enterprise Ireland and the IDA, examines in detail how the Irish supply chain is positioned to capture new business arising from expected investment in energy efficient and renewable energy products and services to meet 2020 energy targets.At the launch of the report, the Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources, Mr Pat Rabitte, TD said As the sustainable energy transition continues to gather momentum, Ireland must position itself to capture the economic benefits available. This requires diverse skillsets, as well as technology-specific knowledge, characteristics that Irelands flexible and well educated workforce is ready to provide.Over the last five years, the SEAI Better Energy: National Upgrade Programme has resulted in an average investment in energy efficiency-related construction of around 230m a year. Since 2009, 340 projects have been completed under the Better Energy Workplaces programme in business and the public sector. The total value of energy savings from technologies deployed through this schemes and the Better Energy Home upgrade to date stands at over 100 million per year.The table below, taken from the report outlines the size of the Irish market for a range of sustainable energy supply chains including the estimated annual expenditure for the Irish market to 2020. With an estimabed annual investment of between 2.2billion to 2.6 billion required for investment in sustainable energy technologies.SIZE OF IRISH MARKET FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SUPPLY CHAINSThe technologies outlined in this table are supported by the Irish Government, details are outlined in the National Renewable Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Action Plans with an expansion of these policies aimed at increasing the rate of deployment of sustainable energy technologies and services.Recent announcements include the opening of a 70 million National Energy Efficiency Fund, which is expected to leverage 300 million of investment. Further support is available through an Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme (EEOS) requiring energy suppliers to achieve energy savings targets with final consumers between 2014 and 2020. This Scheme is compelling utility companies to provide support for energy efficient upgrades.Frontline Energy are working closely with a number of utility companies, helping identify and implement energy efficiency upgrade projects. Click here to view a number of recent building upgrade works.There is additional potential in the business and public sectors, which are currently being supported by SEAIs programmes for business, including the Large Industry Energy Network (LIEN), SME supports and the Public Sector Programme.In addition to the requirements to meet Irelands sustainable energy targets, there are further business opportunities in EU and international markets, with the EU market estimated to be 70 times that of Ireland. As a clean energy location, with a more diverse and secure energy supply, together with active supply chains, Ireland has the opportunity to attract further Foreign Direct Investment in this area.To find out if your business, building or facility is eligible for any of the supports available, get in touch with one of our Energy team by phone or email for more information.Contact: info@frontlineenergy.ie or call + 353 1 643 2100.

  • Elements of Energy Efficient Lightbulbs

    This video explores the various elements that make up good quality energy efficient LED bulbs, courtesy of EPA Energy Star.The Frontline Energy Team have successfully carried out a number of energy efficient lighting upgrades for clients across different sectors. Read more here to find out howupgrading carpark lightingcan help Property owners achieve big savings.Frontline Energy provide a comprehensive range ofEnergy Managementservices across a number of different sectors including, energy audits, energy strategies and upgrade works to building equipment including HVAC and lighting upgrades among other services.Get in touch with Tom or Chris now on 01 643 2100 to find out how you can be more energy smart. Or email tom.gillette@frontlineenergy.ie for our simple four step Frontline Smart Energy solution.amp;amp;amp;lt;br _moz_dirty="" /amp;amp;amp;gt;Video is courtesy of Energy Star,an internationally recognised energy rating standard for electronic equipment.(via YouTube)

  • European Funding for Low Carbon Energy Projects

    The European Investment Bank (EIB) is to invest 2bn in funding for low-carbon renewable-energy projects across the European Union.NER300 is a financing instrument managed jointly by the European Commission, European Investment Bank and Member States, so-called because Article 10(a) 8 of the revised Emissions Trading Directive 2009/29/EC contains the provision to set aside 300 million allowances (rights to emit one tonne of carbon dioxide) in the New Entrants Reserve of the European Emissions Trading Scheme for subsidising installations of innovative renewable energy technology and carbon capture and storage (CCS).Source http://www.ner300.com/The fundinghas been raised by the targeted sale of 300m emission allowances, which is now worth an estimated 548m under the NER300 programme.The EIB started to sell the first round of EU allowances covered by the NER300 scheme in 2011, followed by more than 1.5bn raised during the first phase of sales that ended in 2012.According to Jonathon Taylor, EIB Vice-PresidentThe EIB is pleased to support future investment in low-carbon demonstration projects. Successful completion of monetisation of carbon allowances under the NER300 scheme will help both carbon capture and storage schemes and innovative renewable-energy projects across Europe reach a commercial scale. We will continue to work closely with the EC to ensure that the best applicants can be awarded proceeds raised from the ground-breaking NER300 scheme.

  • World Energy Consumption 1971-2009

    Infographic based on OECD energy statistics 2009 showing world energy consumption.Infographicssource Visually.

  • The Economics of Energy Efficiency

    A misalignment is occurring in the debate surrounding energy use and rising CO2 levels with a clear disconnect between the business and environmental community.On one side is the science community, remonstrating the use of fossil fuels and the catastrophic implications this will have on rising C02 levels, from extreme weather events to melting ice and rising sea levels.Then, on the other hand the business community fears that any drastic changes to the economy to face this threat will have catastrophic effects on the worlds economy. With the Digital Revolution impacting and accelerating change at breakneck speed in every sector and industry worldwide, including how people interact with each other, this state of constant flux is already creating uncertainty. The increased use of technology itself is putting its own additional demand on energy resources, with data centre numbers on the increase worldwide - approximately 1.3% of worldwide electricity use can be pin pointed to data centres. To put it into perspective, a large data centre can use the equivalent energy of a large town. While technology companies are constantly searching for new ways to neutralise their carbon outputs and become more energy efficient, it will always be an uphill struggle due to consumers appetite for technology.Where you stand on the Carbon debate is likely tied to your political philosophy, your education, your location and your place in the economy.However anew studyby the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, a group that promotes simply using energy better, suggests we can reduce CO2 levels with no net cost to the economy.The predominant focus is on localising Energy Efficiency Strategies, and on micro economies, the knock on impact of this is potentially substantial. Like the old adage, count your pennies and the pounds will count themselves. The simple overview recommends focussing on the following:Local Government through awareness campaigns and Energy Environmental Leadership.Water and waste facilities Interestingly on this point, the recent winners of the Irish Times Innovation Awards 2014 OxyMem are pushing innovation through their water treatment technology, or as they state Changing the Economics of Water Waste Treatment.Strategies focussing on commercial buildings and industry,this is where Energy Consultants such as Frontline Energy can work with businesses and building owners to identify operational and behavioural changes and make a positive impact to their cost base and energy use.Residential Energy Use As BER Certification is now a requirement and with some grant programs available through SEAI home owners are now more inclined to implement energy efficient upgrades, in turn creating employment among local contractors and tradespeople.Utility Companies, supporting local energy efficiency projects. With utility companies now expected to offset their carbon by implementing and supporting energy efficiency upgrades and projects, this push is now beginning to gain some ground.If you are considering an upgrade to your building or ways to streamline energy use through your business processes, get in touch with our team here to find out what energy saving options you could avail of and if your business or building is eligible for some of the funding options available.amp;amp;amp;lt;!-- #mc_embed_signup{background:#fff; clear:left; font:14px Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; } /* Add your own MailChimp form style overrides in your site stylesheet or in this style block. We recommend moving this block and the preceding CSS link to the HEAD of your HTML file. */ --amp;amp;amp;gt;

  • Carbon Tax Increase on Solid Fuels

    Carbon Tax is ever on the increase and is one of a number of factors affecting energy price rises. Solid Fuel Carbon Tax (SFCT) an excise duty applicable to solid fuel supplied in Ireland has been in effect since 1st May 2013 and is set to increase on 1st May 2014.So who pays the tax?The person or company making the first supply is liable for the Carbon Tax. The tax is be collected on a self-assessed basis.Solid fuel price increaseHow much is it?The Rate of tax in effect 1st May 2013 is based on a charge of 10 per tonne of CO2 emitted by the fuel concerned.This rates will increase to 20 per tonne with effect from 1st May 2014, the graph illustrates the increase.What tax relief is available?Wood is not liable to the tax and wood products that have no solid fuel component are not liable to Solid Fuel Carbon Tax (SFCT).A full relief from the tax is applicable to solid fuel supplied for use solely in the generation of electricity.A full relief is applicable also to peat delivered for use in an installation that is covered by a greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) permit issued by the Environmental Protection Agency.A partial relief applies for coal delivered for use in an installation covered by a GHG permit.The relief may be applied at source by the supplier making the first supply, provided that the consumer gives the supplier, in advance of such supply, a properly completed declaration on the use of solid fuel. If the supplier does not receive the declaration in sufficient time before a supply is made, the relief may not be applied at source, Instead, the supplier must account for the tax and the consumer must claim the relief subsequently from Revenue.Full relief from the tax by means of repayment to the consumer is provided also for peat delivered to them for use in environmentally friendly heat and power co-generation.A partial relief from the tax is available to consumers for coal delivered to them for environmentally friendly heat and power co-generation.The relief for heat and power co-generation is subject to the condition that the CHP unit to which the solid fuel is being supplied, is certified by the Commission for Energy Regulation as meeting the high efficiency criteria laid down in EU regulations.

  • Carbon Tax Increase on Solid Fuels

    Carbon Tax is ever on the increase and is one of a number of factors affecting energy price rises. Solid Fuel Carbon Tax (SFCT) an excise duty applicable to solid fuel supplied in Ireland has been in effect since 1st May 2013 and is set to increase on 1st May 2014.So who pays the tax?The person or company making the first supply is liable for the Carbon Tax. The tax is be collected on a self-assessed basis.Solid fuel price increaseHow much is it?The Rate of tax in effect 1st May 2013 is based on a charge of 10 per tonne of CO2 emitted by the fuel concerned.This rates will increase to 20 per tonne with effect from 1st May 2014, the graph illustrates the increase.What tax relief is available?Wood is not liable to the tax and wood products that have no solid fuel component are not liable to Solid Fuel Carbon Tax (SFCT).A full relief from the tax is applicable to solid fuel supplied for use solely in the generation of electricity.A full relief is applicable also to peat delivered for use in an installation that is covered by a greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) permit issued by the Environmental Protection Agency.A partial relief applies for coal delivered for use in an installation covered by a GHG permit.The relief may be applied at source by the supplier making the first supply, provided that the consumer gives the supplier, in advance of such supply, a properly completed declaration on the use of solid fuel. If the supplier does not receive the declaration in sufficient time before a supply is made, the relief may not be applied at source, Instead, the supplier must account for the tax and the consumer must claim the relief subsequently from Revenue.Full relief from the tax by means of repayment to the consumer is provided also for peat delivered to them for use in environmentally friendly heat and power co-generation.A partial relief from the tax is available to consumers for coal delivered to them for environmentally friendly heat and power co-generation.The relief for heat and power co-generation is subject to the condition that the CHP unit to which the solid fuel is being supplied, is certified by the Commission for Energy Regulation as meeting the high efficiency criteria laid down in EU regulations.

  • Socio-Economics And The Future Of Energy

    Interesting video from Cambridge University around various aspects of the future of energy, delving into socio-economic factors that are not often explored.The world today, consumes a amount of energy with demand on the increase. We know that producing this energy has significant environmental impacts.In the film below produced by Cambridge University, three academics look at wind power, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and material efficiency as examples of how we can cut our C02 emissions. They suggest that we must act now in order to avoid the serious risks of man-made global warming, one of our greatest challenges in the 21st century.

  • Socio-Economics And The Future Of Energy

    Interesting video from Cambridge University around various aspects of the future of energy, delving into socio-economic factors that are not often explored.The world today, consumes a amount of energy with demand on the increase. We know that producing this energy has significant environmental impacts.In the film below produced by Cambridge University, three academics look at wind power, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and material efficiency as examples of how we can cut our C02 emissions. They suggest that we must act now in order to avoid the serious risks of man-made global warming, one of our greatest challenges in the 21st century.

  • Energy Efficient Car Park Lighting Projects

    For building owners and building occupants responsible for electricity bills, undertaking a car park lighting project can achieve substantial savings over a short period of time.Car park lighting upgrades are one of the quickest and easiest methods of gaining energy savings.When you consider that car park lighting can be left running 24/7, 365 days, that is a lot of energy being consumed.Car Park lighting needs to be on for safety reasons, however more often than not, during the night you may have prolonged periods of an hour or two at a time with no foot or vehicle traffic, and other periods during the day with an intermittent requirement. Controlling lighting use through motion detection sensors and PIR sensors simply makes sense.When considering types of fixings, it is worth considering some of the highlights of efficient LED fixtures:They can require up to 44% less electrical power compared to traditional fluorescent lights for equallighting.LED lights use energy more efficiently, consuming 2 W/m2 per 100 lux insteadof the 5 W/m2 of fluorescent lighting.LED lights can be dimmed but also provide a more uniform light.They have longer average lamp life: 10.000 hours of fluorescent bulbs vs 60.000 hours of LEDlights.LED lights do not have mercury or lead so are more environmentally friendly.By understanding patterns of use, combining better control solutions with low energy fixings, savings of up to 85% of the lighting energy bill can be achieved.Get in touch with the Frontline Energy Team for more information.Other articles that may be of interest:LED Inventors awarded the Nobel PrizePreventative and Reactive Building Maintenance

  • Energy Efficient Car Park Lighting Projects

    For building owners and building occupants responsible for electricity bills, undertaking a car park lighting project can achieve substantial savings over a short period of time.Car park lighting upgrades are one of the quickest and easiest methods of gaining energy savings.When you consider that car park lighting can be left running 24/7, 365 days, that is a lot of energy being consumed.Car Park lighting needs to be on for safety reasons, however more often than not, during the night you may have prolonged periods of an hour or two at a time with no foot or vehicle traffic, and other periods during the day with an intermittent requirement. Controlling lighting use through motion detection sensors and PIR sensors simply makes sense.When considering types of fixings, it is worth considering some of the highlights of efficient LED fixtures:They can require up to 44% less electrical power compared to traditional fluorescent lights for equallighting.LED lights use energy more efficiently, consuming 2 W/m2 per 100 lux insteadof the 5 W/m2 of fluorescent lighting.LED lights can be dimmed but also provide a more uniform light.They have longer average lamp life: 10.000 hours of fluorescent bulbs vs 60.000 hours of LEDlights.LED lights do not have mercury or lead so are more environmentally friendly.By understanding patterns of use, combining better control solutions with low energy fixings, savings of up to 85% of the lighting energy bill can be achieved.Get in touch with the Frontline Energy Team for more information.Other articles that may be of interest:LED Inventors awarded the Nobel PrizePreventative and Reactive Building Maintenance

  • Energy Efficiency and Behavioural Change

    One of the factors that is vital to successful energy efficiency measures includes human interaction with spaces.Our infographic below explores how these factors work and combine together for more sustainable practices.

  • Energy Efficiency and Behavioural Change

    One of the factors that is vital to successful energy efficiency measures includes human interaction with spaces.Our infographic below explores how these factors work and combine together for more sustainable practices.

  • Past, Present, Future World Energy Use

    Great infographic exploring the Worlds Energy Supply.by Nakanishi.Infographicssource Visually.

  • District Heating Infographic

    With energy prices constantly on the increase, the need for more efficient and cost effective energy solutions with less reliance on fossil fuels is crucial to future proofing our built environment.District Energy or District Heating Systems are practical and tangible solutions for use in densely populated areas.Heat produced during industrial processes or electricity generation which would otherwise be wasted is captured and distributed through the system for use in residential and commercial applications as space and water heating.Click on the Infographic to enlarge and learn more about District Energy / Heating Systems and their benefits.Other articles that you may be interested in:District Heating OverviewDistrict Heating - FAQ's for usersHeat Protection SchemeBuilding Regulations and Benefits of District Heating.Can't find what you are looking for? Get in touch.

  • World Energy Resource Overview

    The Simple Overview of Energy Reserves and Renewable EnergyInfographic created by Moneysupermarketcourtesy ofVisually.

  • Enterprise Ireland Green Start

    Enterprise Ireland isencouraging clients to adopt Lean business principles in their organisation to increase performance and competitiveness.With a focus on sustainability the recent Green Start and Green Plus programs help companies meet and exceed regulatory requirements and improve efficiency through eco-efficiency assessments, site audits and technical advice.Grants are through Business Process Improvement Grants under the Lean Plus Assignment or GreenPlus Assignment. Contact our team now at info@frontlineenergy.ie for more information.

  • Infographic for CHP installations in Ireland

    Infographic for CHP installations in IrelandCombined Heat and Power installations are an excellent way of implementing demand side energy reduction. The Irish Government has set a target under the NEEAP for 800MWe installed CHP capacity.Infographic exploring CHP Combined Heat and power installations in Ireland.

  • Air Conditioning in Offices

    Are You Overheating?Record high temperatures in Ireland are revealing the inadequacies of air conditioning systems throughout the country. As the heat is set to continue, albeit with a bit less glorious sunshine it is worth understanding why cooling issues occur in air conditioned building.The inadequacies can manifest in two ways:Particular rooms overheatingIndividuals within the same room may experience different temperaturesIncorrect Room TemperatureIf a room is overheating it may because of the way your system is commissioned, solutions which Frontline can provide include:Monitoring the amount of cool water sent to cooling unitsConducting a shade analysis to see whether the room would benefit from installation of UV window films, or other devicesEnsuring that A/C units are fully charged with refrigerant gasEnsuring system balance to confirm that all parts of the system are receiving the designed flowConducting an analysis to determine whether an upgrade is necessaryIndividuals Experiencing Temperature ExtremesIf various individuals within a room are experiencing different temperatures this is most likely to do with an incorrect airflow distribution on the floor. This may be as a result of poor initial balancing, or a change in floor layout.In order to rectify this, Frontline can install temperature loggers throughout the room in order to capture data, allowing us to customise an airflow solution. This can result in increased employee comfort and productivity.If you are having issues with your temperature levels, give the Frontline technical team a call now on 1850 676 676, or email info@frontlineenergy.ie

  • Energy Efficient Lighting Project

    Frontline have successfully completed the retrofit of all basement lighting in the Arena Complex, Whitestown Way.This project included the complete re-design of the lighting layout along with the installation of Passive Infrared Sensors throughout the complex to achieve maximum energy savings. The Motion Sensor PIR Light Switch detects PIR body heat motion and automatically switches the light ON, turning it OFF again within a time specified.Expected payback period is 2.2years

  • Energy Benchmarking Project - Nationwide

    Calling all BER Assessors Frontline are currently involved in a nationwide project and are seeking expressions of interest from BER Assessors nationwide.Please contact our team atenergy@frontlineenergy.ieBy Friday 29th March 2013.

  • National Energy Efficiency Action Plan 2009-2020

    The National Energy Efficiency Action Plan 2009 2020 (NEEAP), published by the Department of Communications, Energy Natural Resources, set an overall national goal of 20% improvement in energy efficiency by 2020.A number of compliance and legislative requirements have already been set in place as a result of this including Building Energy Rating Certificates and Display Energy Certificates, in a drive to reduce energy consumption. The Irish public sector is leading the way in this area through the development of Energy Management Strategies.This chart represents the distribution of energy use across each sector in Ireland.% Distribution of Energy use in Ireland across sectorsRising energy costs, the adverse environmental impacts of fossil fuel use and our dependence on imports are making energy management an imperative for our economy, our environment and our business - SEAIAs we are a third of the way through the time set out in the NEEAP it is becoming more and more important to take control of energy use and in doing so implement economically viable solutions, making your business or corporation more sustainable.In order to meet their obligations under this directive (referred to as the Energy Efficiency Obligation Scheme EEOS) Electric Ireland are now providing funding support to Irish businesses for energy efficient upgrade projects.Other articles that may interest you:Grant and Financing SupportElectric Ireland Provide Funding SupportEnergy Efficiency Policy ToolkitFor more information on energy compliance, legislation and funding contact our energy team.

  • Charlestown Town Centre

    Frontline maintains and runs the energy centre at Charlestown Town Centre providing all heat and energy requirements to both the retail outlets and residential customers.Savings of 65% in 2011 were achieved for our client and we expect to achieve a further 10% in 2012. Read more about our energy saving initiatives methods and results by clicking hereCharlestown pdf.

  • Green Awards Shortlist

    Green Awards ShortlistFrontline Energy Environmentalare delighted to announce that they have been short listed for the Green Awards 2012.We have been nominated for the Green Energy Award for our involvement in Charlestown Centres energy centre. We are proud to announce that our nominated candidate for the Green Leader Award has also been short listed.Contact our team of energy experts today and see how we can improve your buildings efficiency, helping you save both cost and carbon.

  • SEAI Better Workplace Grants Announced

    Pat Rabbitte, this week announced the launch of a capital fund to support sustainable energy investments in 2012 in the public, commercial, industrial and community sectors.Building on the success of previous schemes, this fund will ramp up the competitiveness of Irish business by delivering real savings in an affordable way for both public and private enterprise. This is a timely example of organisations in Ireland working towards best practice in energy efficiency to deliver real benefits in all sectors of our economy.Our energy engineers are currently working with clients to facilitate their applications,the closing date is the 30th April 2012. Contact us here for further information.

  • Energy Performance Contract

    Frontline were commissioned in February to provide an important lighting upgrade to a Hospital, in west Dublin, the installation was completed in June 2012. The contract is structured under an energy performance contract (EPC)for the Client to ensure their investment see no negative cash drain, this comes under our Design, Build, Operate and Finance service offering.In essence a Frontline EPC is aperformance-based procurement method and financial model where utility bill savings resulting from the installation of new building systems cover and pay for the cost of the building project over a period of time.According to Frontlines contract manager, Fintan M.Lyons This project involves upgrading all lighting to energy efficient fixtures and lamps. The improved lighting control system, will include a mixture of motion and daylight sensors. These sensors and other control elements will be located strategically to reflect the usage of each space.All of these elements will all be supplied and installed by Frontlines in house team of technicians.For more information on our Energy Performance Contracting, contact us on 1850 656 656

  • Frontline to provide Facility Management services to Scotch House

    Frontline to provide Facility Management services to Scotch HouseFrontlinehave been engaged to provide facility management services for Scotch House on Burgh Quay, Dublin 2.Scotch House occupies a prominent corner position on the south side of the river Liffey.On the junction of Burgh Quay and Hawkins Street in Dublin 2. The property comprises six storeys over basement.Frontline will be responsible for the maintenance and preventative maintenance of the entire building, our safe pair of hands approach will deliver a reliable and quality service.

  • Frontline Shortlisted for Energy Award

    Frontline Energy Environmental are proud to announce that they have been shortlisted in the Energy Efficient Service of the Year category at the Energy Awards 2011 on Thursday 1 December 2011 at the Grange St. Pauls Hotel, London.Being shortlisted for this award is testament to our hard work, innovation and dedication to helping our clients improve the sustainability and operation of their buildings.Contact our team of energy experts today and see how we can improve your buildings efficiency and help you save.For more information on the awards see www.theenergyawards.com/247647

  • Frontline secure an SEAI grant on behalf of their client Merinda Developments

    Frontline Energy Environmental are delivering a number of energy efficiency upgrade projects at the Merrion Hall offices on Strand Road in Sandymount on behalf of their clients Merinda Developments.Frontline have secured grant funding from the SEAI as part of the 2011 Better Energy Workplaces programme, which supports sustainable energy upgrade projects.The lighting upgrade project will result in the installation of low energy light fittings to the office areas in conjunction with advanced lighting controls. There will also be an upgrade to the existing BMS controls and heating systems as part of this project.This retrofit project will result in a significant improvement in the energy performance of this building, and enhanced comfort conditions for all building users.

  • Two UK firms prosecuted for not taking Legionella risk seriously

    An Investigation by the HSE has led to the prosecution of two firms in the UK in relation to their failure to monitor levels of the Legionella bacteria in their water system.To view article please click here

  • Urgent Business Update - Fight Back and Take More Control of your Energy Costs

    Urgent Business Update Fight Back and Take More Control of your Energy CostsAnnouncements by Bord Gis outlining their plans to increase electricity by up to 14% and gas prices by up to 30%, require businesses to fight back and take action to reduce their energy bills.To view article please click here

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